CSS
  1. CSS intro
  2. CSS stylesheets
  3. CSS syntax
  4. CSS Classes & ID's
  5. CSS comments
  6. CSS BG properties
  7. CSS text properties
  8. CSS font properties
  9. CSS list properties
  10. CSS border properties
  11. CSS margin properties
  12. CSS padding properties
  13. CSS outline properties
  14. CSS table properties
  15. CSS dim properties
  16. CSS class properties
  17. CSS position properties
  18. CSS pseudo classes
  19. CSS pseudo elements
  20. CSS shortcuts
  21. CSS media types
  22. CSS summary

Introduction to CSS

With CSS, you can specify the style, layout, and appearance of various elements on webpages.

This tutorial focuses on:

What you should already know

Before studying CSS, you should already have at least a basic understanding of HTML/XHTML. CSS is used to specify the overall appearance of webpages written in HTML/XHTML. To use CSS for this purpose, you should first have at least a basic understanding of webpage building. Check out our HTML tutorials or XHTML tutorials if you are not yet familiar with these languages.

What is CSS?

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets. It is a language designed to specify the overall appearance of webpages as well as the appearance and structure of the text and elements such as images and buttons on webpages and their layout. Styles can be specified with CSS using internal style sheet definitions which are placed right into HTML/XHTML code or in external files.

CSS and HTML

Not just a language all its own, CSS is a part of HTML. The first version of HTML to include CSS was HTML 4.0

CSS was added to HTML to solve a particular problem - the problem of the content of HTML documents not being separated from the layout of the documents. This problem arose when the two most popular web browsers (Netscape and Internet Explorer) continuously added new tags and attributes to the HTML specification. Without the use of formatting tags, the layout of an HTML document was supposed to be taken care of by web browsers. The original purpose of HTML tags was to specify the content that will appear on webpages, and not their layout. But this was no longer the case, as Netscape and Internet Explorer added to the HTML specification.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) - the organization responsible for developing and maintaining standards on the world wide web created CSS to solve the problem of content not being separated from layout. While CSS should be used to specify the overall appearance of webpages as well as the appearance and structure of the text and elements such as images and buttons on webpages and their layout, HTML/XHTML should be used to specify the content on webpages.

What can be done with CSS?

All this and much more can be done with CSS!

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